IMG-8636.jpg

Indigenous Goddess Gang

Creating a space for sharing medicine through poetry, food & seed knowledge, herbalism, music and more. This is a space for reclaiming knowledge from an indigenous femme lens. Each month we will honor a different tribe of matriarchs in our fashion shoots. Each month we will continue to grow and share the knowledge of our matriarchs and share that medicine. 

Indigenous Goddess Gang is a space intended for INDIGENOUS people. We've had our land taken from us, we've had our cultures taken from us,  we've had our languages taken from us. This is a step towards reclaiming our knowledge, identity and medicine.  This site is not intended for exploiting or appropriating.  Tread lightly and respectfully. 

Black Belt Eagle Scout

Black Belt Eagle Scout

“I started Black Belt Eagle Scout as a way to express myself solely and in a genuine way. I had been playing in bands where I was a contributing member, but never in a band where I was the only songwriter and recording artist. Going into my late 20s, I desperately needed this kind of project in my life to feel like all of the time and energy put into learning my instruments was being put to a fulfilling creative force. I talk about my identity openly because of the Indigenous and queer voices that were silenced before me. I talk about my identity openly because my parents and grandparents and great-grandparents taught me to. I talk about my identity openly because I have the privilege to. I talk about my identity openly because there are more identities out there like mine that don’t get a platform to be visible. I talk about my identity openly for them, and I talk about my identity openly because I want Indigenous and queer youth to have the ability to as well. My sense of Radical Indigenous Queer Feminism is not just for me—it is for all people to embrace in their own way. It is for ceremony. It is for fighting for our rights as indigenous people and as queer people and as womxn. It is for writing in the English language as a way to decolonize how feminism is made up today. It is for love of my people.” -Katherine Paul from Radical Indigenous Queer Feminism is Ceremony for Talk House

 Image Credit: Jason Quigley

Image Credit: Jason Quigley

Katherine Paul is Black Belt Eagle Scout, and after releasing an EP in 2014 Paul has wrapped up the band’s first full-length. Recorded in the middle of winter near her hometown in Northwest Washington, the landscape’s eerie beauty and Paul’s connection to it are palpable onMother of My Children. Stemming from this place, the album traces the full spectrum of confronting buried feelings and the loss of what life was supposed to look like. Growing up on a small Indian reservation, Paul’s family was focused on native drumming, singing, and arts. “Native American music is the foundation for all of my music,” Paul explains. With the support of her family and a handful of bootleg Hole and Nirvana VHS tapes, Paul taught herself how to play guitar. In 2007, Paul moved to Portland, OR, to attend school and get involved with the Rock ’n’ Roll Camp for Girls. Paul has switched between guitar and drums in an assortment of projects over the last decade, citing Forest Park as a particularly strong influence on how her songwriting has grown. “It was my introduction to post-rock,” Paul recalls, “From there, I was able to develop my own sound and style more.” On Mother of My Children, Black Belt Eagle Scout tenderly blends post-rock with Paul’s earlier grunge influences and later, more confessional Pacific Northwest artists like Ô Paon and Mirah. The album begins with the singles “Soft Stud” and “Indians Never Die”, and on the latter, Paul’s message is clear: “It’s a call out to colonizers and those who don’t respect the Earth; they don’t care about the water, they don’t care about how they are destroying what is around them. Indigenous people are the protectors of this land, and others need to wake up and get on the same page.” The songs weave together to capture both the enduring and fleeting experiences of loss, frustration, and dreaming. The structures are traditional, but the lyrics don’t adhere to any format other than what feels right in the moment. “I don’t play music to write songs,” Paul explains, “I play music to process feelings, and sometimes what comes out of that is a song.” Paired with Paul’s clear and measured voice, each song leaves the listener feeling as if they were there when the song was written, the immediate, candid emotion tangible. Mother of My Children is a life chapter gently preserved, and the access listeners have to such vulnerability feels special and generous. We are left wanting more, and all signs point to Black Belt Eagle Scout just getting started. The album is out now on Saddle Creek.  -Alex Hebler

Check out Black Belt Eagle Scout’s upcoming TOUR DATES

Black Belt Eagle Scout's Mother of My Children is out now on Saddle Creek

Find more music from Black Belt Eagle Scout on Bandcamp

Laura Ortman

Laura Ortman

0